Leaders to Leader

Lessons from the Great American Leaders & How They Apply Now

Posts Tagged ‘validity

Six Ways to Enhance Your Personal Credibility

with 6 comments

leaderinchair

Personal credibility is based upon a leader’s character and integrity and the actions and behaviors that stem from them. Far from perfect, many of the leaders I surveyed had character flaws and displayed at times, questionable ethical behaviors. Yet their personal credibility remained intact. So it is safe to ascertain that perfection is not humanly expected and attainable as a leader, but self-awareness of one’s strengths and weaknesses is essential. It reflects both maturity and authenticity, which only then serves to enhance a leader’s personal credibility.

An observance of the absence of self-awareness resulted in a strong emergence of arrogance and hubris that diminished and ultimately destroyed credibility on all levels.

Obviously unless problematic or weak leaders make concerted efforts to change their character and integrity, they are remain unalterable. However leaders do have control over the actions, behaviors and decisions that influence and shape their personal credibility. This once again involves self-awareness as well as comprehensive critical thinking abilities to examine the consequences of both their long and short-term actions. All leaders have choices, but the right choices demand a leader’s willingness and acquiescence.

Leaders must also be cognizant of their levels of personal credibility on all of their key constituencies. In the current environment where short-term profitability is emphasized, many leaders damage their credibility by only focusing on their shareholder expectations at the expense of their other constituencies. My research demonstrates this can be fatal. The leaders listed as “Worst CEOs of All Time” by Portfolio Magazine commonly practiced it. This imbalance ultimately leads to a loss of validity.

There are six recommendations you can take to enhance your personal credibility:

  1. Develop an awareness of your personal strengths and weaknesses including a frank assessment of your character and personal levels of integrity.
  2. Determine how these affect your personal credibility.
  3. Identify what actions, decisions and behaviors you can change.
  4. Develop a habit of assessing the impact and consequences of your actions on your personal credibility.
  5. Change what you can, and manage and control what you can’t.
  6. Remember this is an evolutionary process and not a singular event. History shows that individuals evolved into becoming great leaders over the span of their entire careers. For many it was a struggle.

It is important to remember that no leader is an island onto oneself, who functions in isolation. Nor is the individual the first one to encounter problems associated with building his or her credibility. Universally, the leaders surveyed all struggled with this issue at one point or another in their careers.

Excerpt: Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Majorium Business Press, Stevens Point, WI 2011)

 Click here to Read a Free Chapter.

Copyright © 2013 Timothy F. Bednarz, All Rights Reserved

Advertisements

Written by Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D.

October 3, 2013 at 11:21 am

Legitimacy: The Sole Basis of Leadership

with 13 comments

My research on the leadership qualities and characteristics of famous American leaders to determine what makes leaders great, I designated a pattern that defined the great leaders as The Legitimacy Principles. These were presented in a previous article: For the purpose of clarification, the definition of The Legitimacy Principles need to be restated:

The Legitimacy Principles enumerate the linkages of leaders’ legitimacy, credibility, trust and a balance of emotional standing and bonds with all key constituencies.

The synergetic relationship between these key factors of success is the foundation of effective leadership and provides insight into a new definition of it.

The fundamental essence of leadership is legitimacy, whose substance is based upon authority and validity. While authority is conferred, validity is earned through the development of credibility, trust and a balance of emotional standing and connections with all key constituencies.

The presence of the Legitimacy Principles endow leaders with the authority to lead, manage, execute, empower, effectively communicate, sell their vision, generate a passion for success, and overcome adversity. Their absence results in ultimate failure as an effective leader.

Legitimacy is the cornerstone of effective leadership. Jon Huntsman, Sr wrote in his book, Winners Never Cheat Even in Difficult Times:

“Effective, respected leadership is maintained through mutual agreement. Leadership demanded is leadership denied. Leadership is not meant to be dominion over others. Rather, it is the composite of characteristics that earns respect, results, and a continued following.”

The great leaders possess this critical leadership trait. However, legitimacy is seldom discussed, if even mentioned in most leadership books. The absence of a definitive definition leads to confusion as to what defines legitimacy. Its definition needs to be clarified and placed within a proper context.

It is assumed that leaders automatically possess legitimacy. My research demonstrates that this is a fallacy. It shows that legitimacy is derived from two separate sources that grant leaders permission to lead.

Related: Have You Earned Permission to Lead?

The first source is authority or the power granted to leaders by either election, or appointment to an office. In the business setting, this is conferred by the stockholders through the board of directors. Rudolph Giuliani observed:

“A leader is chosen because whoever puts him there trusts his judgment, character and intelligence… It’s a leader’s duty to act on those attributes.”

The second source is validity. Validity is not conferred, nor is it automatically achieved once one is appointed. It is earned and is a contributing factor to the authority granted to a leader, typically over the span of his or her career. This defines a leader as genuine and authentic in the eyes of all key constituencies.

Related: Emotional Bonds are a Reflection of a Leader’s Effectiveness

Both sources of legitimacy compliment each other, but validity provides an enduring, yet fragile acquiescence of all the constituencies that gives a leader the tacit permission to lead. It is built upon three critical factors: trust, credibility and emotional balance.

My research demonstrates that these are the hallmarks of great leaders. Without the presence of these three critical factors, the leader’s validity collapses. Once a leader loses his or her validity, the authority to lead is significantly undermined.

Huntsman stated:

“Leadership is a privilege. Those who receive the mantle must also know they can expect an accounting of their stewardships. It is not uncommon for people to forego higher salaries to join an organization with strong, ethical leadership. Most individuals desire leadership they can admire and respect. They want to be in sync with that brand of leader, and will often parallel their own lives after that person…”

Related: Your Commitment to Others Defines You as a Leader

For more information on this topic and to read a free chapter, refer to Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It by Timothy F. Bednarz (Majorium Business Press, Stevens Point, WI 2011).

Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D. | Author | Publisher | Majorium Business Press
Author of Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Finalist – 2011 Foreword Reviews‘ Book of the Year)
Linkedin | Facebook | Twitter | Web| Blog | Catalog |800.654.4935 | 715.342.1018

Copyright © 2012 Timothy F. Bednarz, All Rights Reserved

What’s Involved in the ‘Teaming Process’

with 2 comments

The methodologies used for problem-solving and decision-making can be complex. When initiating team projects, both leaders and teams can get bogged down in complicated problem solving, decision-making and process-improvement models. Rather than utilize methodologies that are difficult to understand and implement, leaders should provide their teams with a simplified model to accomplish a specific assignment.

It is important for teams to have a universal model with a consistent and simple template to monitor task progress and chart the development and implementation of actions and strategies. This type of model will help teams benchmark progress, enhance performance and discover an identity.

It is important for leaders to understand that problem-solving models typically include 7 or 8 stages, and decision-making models typically have 6-12 stages. Most teams struggle with the complicated procedures of these models, and many neglect or omit stages at the first available opportunity. Team effectiveness and productivity will consequently increase when leaders implement a simplified model and process.

Related: Strategies and Solutions for Solving Team Problems

Consequently, leaders should be cognizant of the five essential team process stages discussed below.

Recognition

The recognition stage encompasses the team’s impressions when facing a new situation. This stage is critical to the success or failure of the team process. Here, before making an initial response, teams are challenged with identifying the circumstances surrounding a problem or task. Nothing useful is gained until the team becomes fully aware of and clearly defines these circumstances.

The first step is to identify and define the task or purpose at hand, taking into account existing biases, assumptions and constraints. Also, teams must establish their objectives and the regulations for the process, and then pinpoint the most ideal outcome.

Understanding

The primary purpose of this stage is to check the validity and accuracy of the issues identified in the recognition stage. Next, the team must determine which data should be collected to help clarify the details of the task. Finally, they must prepare an analysis detailing how the team will carry out its project.

Related: Correctly Framing Problems Pinpoints the Right Solution

Decision Making

The decision making stage is a rational linear process comprised of discrete events. These events should be relatively simple and easy to achieve. The assumption here is that as long as each stage is carried out correctly, the end result will be an effective decision.

Decision makers in a team environment should recognize the danger inherent in any recommendations yielded by a process that is governed by subjective criteria. The process they must follow to be successful requires mapping the decision system supporting the entire decision making process: inputs need to be verified along with information that is useful and contextual to the problem.

The decision making process allows teams to finalize their options after clarifying and agreeing to the desired results. The final step in this stage requires the team to apply all of the methodologies and systems that it has decided upon to identify the best potential option.

Implementation

Completing the decision making stage frees the team to act. The implementation stage often begins with excitement and concludes with hard work.

This stage makes plans work by putting them into practice. The process begins with setting up and preparing all of the possible support, resources, people and logistics required. Teams must then develop a strategy for piloting the plan according to its goals and objectives. Immediately after implementation the team continues to think systematically by identifying limiting forces that need to be reduced and by avoiding short-term fixes, negative synergies, adhocism, sabotage and any power blocks that may hinder the project’s success. The last step in this stage is to monitor the progress of the plan against actual results.

Related: Execution: Six Action Steps

Completion

The completion stage is where teams develop assessments and follow-ups, and authority for the project is transferred to the process owners, allowing the team to move on to other projects, problems and concerns.

Adapted from: A Team’s Purpose, Function & Use: Pinpoint Leadership Skill Development Training Series by Timothy Bednarz (Majorium Business Press, Stevens Point, WI 2011).

Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D. | Author | Publisher | Majorium Business Press
Author of Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Finalist – 2011 Foreword Reviews‘ Book of the Year)
Linkedin | Facebook | Twitter | Web| Blog | Catalog |800.654.4935 | 715.342.1018

Copyright © 2012 Timothy F. Bednarz, All Rights Reserved

Written by Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D.

October 11, 2012 at 11:03 am

New Book Reveals The Most Accurate Gauge of Great Leadership is Legitimacy

leave a comment »

At a time when America is crying out for leadership in all sectors of society, a new book, which researched 160 great and influential American leaders, spanning 235 years revealed that the most accurate gauge of great leadership is legitimacy.

It illustrates that the great leaders acquired legitimacy by establishing trust, credibility, respect and emotional bonds and standing with all of their key constituencies, while delivering stellar financial performance.

The research reveals that when leaders balance the needs of all of their key constituencies, they outperform others, who sole focus on shareholder values. The focus on shareholder values concentrates upon the needs of one key constituency, often at the expense of the others. This destroys a leader’s credibility and often the long-term sustainability of the company.

The researcher and author, Timothy Bednarz, Ph.D. designated this pattern in his book Great! What Makes Leaders Great; What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Majorium Business Press) as the Legitimacy Principles.

The Legitimacy Principles enumerate the linkages of leaders’ legitimacy, credibility, trust and a balance of emotional standing and bonds with all key constituencies. The synergetic relationship produced between these key factors of success is the foundation of effective leadership, and it provides insight into a new definition of it.
The fundamental essence of leadership is legitimacy, whose substance is based upon authority and validity. While authority is conferred, validity is earned through the development of credibility, trust and a balance of emotional standing and connections with all key constituencies.

The presence of the Legitimacy Principles endow leaders with the authority to lead, manage, execute, empower, effectively communicate, sell their vision, generate a passion for success, and overcome adversity. Their absence results in ultimate failure as an effective leader.

It is often assumed that leaders automatically possess legitimacy. Great! substantiates that this is a fallacy. It shows that legitimacy is derived from two separate sources that grant leaders permission to lead.

The first source is authority or the power granted to leaders by either election, or appointment to an office. In the business setting, this is conferred by the stockholders through the board of directors.

The second source is validity. Validity is not conferred, nor is it automatically attained once one is appointed. It is earned. It becomes a contributing factor to the authority granted to a leader, typically over the span of his or her career. This defines a leader as genuine and authentic in the eyes of all key constituencies.

Both sources of legitimacy compliment each other. However, validity provides an enduring, yet fragile acquiescence of all the constituencies that gives a leader the tacit permission to lead. It is built upon three critical factors: trust, credibility and a balance of emotional bonds with each key constituency. The findings of the research presented in this book, demonstrates that these are the hallmarks of great leaders. Without the presence of these three critical factors, the leader’s validity collapses. Once a leader loses his or her validity, the authority to lead is significantly undermined, whether for a corporate executive or a political leader. The Legitimacy Principles are applicable to all forms of leadership.

An executive summary and the key findings published in Great! What Makes Leaders Great; What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It can be viewed at http://www.whatmakesleadersgreat.com. The book also can be purchased at this site, or by calling 800-654-4935.

Copyright © 2011 Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D. All Rights Reserved

Six Ways to Enhance Your Personal Credibility

with 10 comments

Personal credibility is based upon a leader’s character and integrity and the actions and behaviors that stem from them. Far from perfect, many of the leaders I surveyed had character flaws and displayed at times, questionable ethical behaviors. Yet their personal credibility remained intact. So it is safe to ascertain that perfection is not humanly expected and attainable as a leader, but self-awareness of one’s strengths and weaknesses is essential. It reflects both maturity and authenticity, which only then serves to enhance a leader’s personal credibility.

An observance of the absence of self-awareness resulted in a strong emergence of arrogance and hubris that diminished and ultimately destroyed credibility on all levels.

Obviously unless problematic or weak leaders make concerted efforts to change their character and integrity, they are remain unalterable. However leaders do have control over the actions, behaviors and decisions that influence and shape their personal credibility. This once again involves self-awareness as well as comprehensive critical thinking abilities to examine the consequences of both their long and short-term actions. All leaders have choices, but the right choices demand a leader’s willingness and acquiescence.

Leaders must also be cognizant of their levels of personal credibility on all of their key constituencies. In the current environment where short-term profitability is emphasized, many leaders damage their credibility by only focusing on their shareholder expectations at the expense of their other constituencies. My research demonstrates this can be fatal. The leaders listed as “Worst CEOs of All Time” by Portfolio Magazine commonly practiced it. This imbalance ultimately leads to a loss of validity.

There are six recommendations you can take to enhance your personal credibility:

  1. Develop an awareness of your personal strengths and weaknesses including a frank assessment of your character and personal levels of integrity.
  2. Determine how these affect your personal credibility.
  3. Identify what actions, decisions and behaviors you can change.
  4. Develop a habit of assessing the impact and consequences of your actions on your personal credibility.
  5. Change what you can, and manage and control what you can’t.
  6. Remember this is an evolutionary process and not a singular event. History shows that individuals evolved into becoming great leaders over the span of their entire careers. For many it was a struggle.

It is important to remember that no leader is an island onto oneself, who functions in isolation. Nor is the individual the first one to encounter problems associated with building his or her credibility. Universally, the leaders surveyed all struggled with this issue at one point or another in their careers.

Excerpt: Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Majorium Business Press, 2011)

If you would like to learn more about how the great American leaders built their credibility through their own inspiring words and stories, refer to Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It. It illustrates how great leaders built great companies, and how you can apply the strategies, concepts and techniques that they pioneered to improve your own leadership skills. Click here to learn more.

Copyright © 2011 Timothy F. Bednarz, All Rights Reserved

Written by Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D.

July 7, 2011 at 10:03 am

%d bloggers like this: