Leaders to Leader

Lessons from the Great American Leaders & How They Apply Now

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You Don’t Choose Your Passions, Your Passions Choose You

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Jeff Bezos - Amazon.com

Jeff Bezos – Amazon.com

Great leaders are passionate. They possess an absolute love for what they do. Steve Jobs (Apple Computer) observed, “I don’t think of my life as a career… I do stuff. I respond to stuff. That’s not a career — it’s a life!” [1] Howard Schultz (Starbucks) concurred when he said: When you love something, when you care so much, when you feel the responsibility… you find another gear.”

James Duke (American Tobacco Company) enthusiastically expressed his passion, when he noted, “I hated to close my desk at night and was eager to get back to it early next morning. I needed no vacation or time off. No fellow does who is really interested in his work.” [2]

Ray Kroc (McDonald’s) couldn’t say enough about his fifteen-cent hamburgers, and Sam Walton (Wal-Mart) was equally passionate about the value that Wal-Mart offered to the average person. Both were evangelists for their companies.

Another passionate evangelist was James Casey (United Parcel Service), as anyone who knew him understood that “it just took the right topic to get him excited. And that topic was packages. He loved everything about them–the care that went into their wrapping, the sense of mystery about their contents, the delight in opening them. A 1947 New Yorker profile found him observing a department store’s package-wrapping station and waxing enthusiastic–and then some–on the proceedings: ‘Deft fingers! Deft fingers wrapping thousands of bundles. Neatly tied! Neatly addressed! Stuffed with soft tissue paper! What a treat! Ah, packages!’ ” [3]

Why is passion so important and why does it contribute so much to one’s success? “Passion is about our emotional energy and a love for what we do. Without passion it becomes difficult to fight back in the face of obstacles and difficulties. People with passion find a way to get things done and to make things happen, in spite of the obstacles and challenges that get in the way.” [4]

Herb Kelleher (Southwest Airlines) stressed the importance of passion when he stated, “When we talk to other people about Southwest Airlines, I always tell them that it’s got to come from the heart not from the head. It has to be spontaneous, it has to be sincere, it has to be emotional. I said, ‘Nobody will believe it if they think it’s just another program that was conjured up for six months time and then you’re going to drop it. The power of it in creating trust is that people have to see that you really radiate, that it’s a passion with you, and you’re not saying these things because you think they are clever or a way to produce more productivity or produce greater profits, but because you really want things to go well for them, individually.” [5]

Jeff Bezos (Amazon) made the following observation about how passion works, and why it motivates so well. “You don’t choose your passions, your passions choose you… One of the huge mistakes people make is that they try to force an interest on themselves. If you’re really interested in software and computer science, you should focus on that. But if you’re really interested in medicine, and you decide you’re going to become an Internet entrepreneur because it looks like everybody else is doing well, then that’s probably not going to work. You don’t choose your passions, your passions choose you. One of the reasons you saw so many companies that were formed in 1998 or 1999 fail is that they were chasing the wave. And that usually doesn’t work. Find that area that you are interested in and passionate about—and wait for the wave to find you.” [6]

[1]  Fry Stephen, The iPad Launch: Can Steve Jobs Do It Again? (Time Magazine, April 1, 2010)

[2]  Klein Maury, The Change Makers (Henry Holt and Company, LLC, New York, NY 2003) p. 99-100

[3]  Lukas Paul, Overfelt Maggie, UPS United Parcel Service James Casey Transformed a Tiny Messenger Service into the World’s Largest Shipper By Getting All Wrapped Up in the Details of Package Delivery (Fortune Small Business, April 1, 2003)

[4]  Ambler George, Steve Jobs and His Leadership (The Practice of Leadership, March 30, 2008)

[5]  Yeh Raymond T. with Yeh Stephanie H., The Art of Business: In the Footsteps of Giants (published October 1, 2004)

[6]  Walker Rob, Jeff Bezos Amazon.com – America’s 25 Most Fascinating Entrepreneurs (Inc. Magazine, April 1, 2004)

Excerpt: Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Majorium Business Press, Stevens Point, WI 2011)

Read a Free Chapter

Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D. | Author | Publisher | Majorium Business Press
Author of Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Finalist – 2011 Foreword Reviews‘ Book of the Year)
Linkedin | Facebook | Twitter | Web| Blog | Catalog |800.654.4935 | 715.342.1018

Copyright © 2013 Timothy F. Bednarz, All Rights Reserved

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Performance Indicators Provide Feedback and Insight into All Levels of Leadership

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woman-w-data

Key performance indicators or metrics allow organizations to create a common reporting system and language that leaders on all levels can understand and use in their decision-making. However, performance measurement decisions deliver key information and data that triggers specific decisions and actions at different levels of the organization.

Performance-based measurement systems provide feedback and insight into all levels of leadership within the organization. Local leaders make decisions based upon trigger points and triggered events as well as overall performance of their organizational units.

On the other hand, senior managers must take a strategic perspective that links the performance of all organizational units into feedback related to the entire organization’s performance; their decisions are global and focus on the sustainability of the entire organization.

It is important for leaders on all levels to understand the links between local performance and the entire organization. Key performance indicators and metrics trigger decisions on multiple levels. Lower trigger points may cause lower levels to react and make decisions and changes based upon the organizational unit in a specific location.

Senior leadership will have trigger points at higher levels that concern the performance of the entire organization, compelling them to make decisions and changes based upon the feedback they receive. While the perspectives may be different at various levels of leadership, the use of key performance indicators and metrics allows all leaders to make the decisions that are their responsibility.

Decisions can be tactical on a local operational level and strategic at a higher leadership level. The decisions are linked in that the strategic decisions will impact tactical decisions, but tactical may not affect strategic. Strategic decisions typically provide leaders with the boundaries and parameters that they must work within.

Leaders at all levels must understand that all decisions impact the organization. Daily decisions may not appear to be connected to the major areas discussed in this section, but, ultimately, all decisions made are based in one of these key areas.

Quality of Execution of Organizational Strategies

The availability of performance measurement systems and key performance indicators provides leaders on all levels of the organization with the decision making tools to measure the quality of the strategy that drives the organization.

Financial indicators are lagging indicators, while non-financial indicators provide leaders with a balanced view of what is happening. Metrics provide leaders with specific questions to facilitate the organization’s ability to make tough decisions and quickly seize opportunities as well as to evaluate how well it adapts to changing technologies and markets.

Improvement of Non-Financial Performance

Non-financial metrics linked with more traditional financial ones provide leaders with the information to make timely decisions that impact their unit’s performance and the entire organization’s ability to adapt. Triggered events and predetermined trigger points provide pivotal moments for leaders to make key performance decisions. These events can be established on both strategic and tactical levels with individual leaders responsible for making specific decisions within the organization.

Value Creation

More companies are using value creation indexes that focus on the relationship between non-financial performance and the organization’s market value. The establishment of a value creation index provides leaders with key insights by establishing direct links between the two areas of focus. Research has shown that a reliance on non-financial performance leads to more accurate forecasts and valuation. Typically the value creation drivers are:

  • Innovation
  • Quality
  • Customers
  • Management
  • Alliances
  • Technology
  • Brand
  • Employees
  • Environment

While value creation is defined and utilized by senior leadership within the organization, its metrics that measure non-financial performance are driven into the organization and become part of the suite of performance measurement tools used by leaders on all levels.

Research has shown that intangible elements such as innovation, alliance, management and employees are the key players in producing the organization’s value. Within the durable and non-durable manufacturing environment, improvement in key value drivers results in higher market values. These are the indicators that allow organizations to measure and predict future performance.

Efficient Resource Allocation

The balanced use of performance measurement systems that evaluate both financial and non-financial performance metrics allow leaders to efficiently allocate the use of scarce resources throughout the organization. Decisions that effectively manage resource allocation allow organizations to sustain their performance and profitability.

While local leadership on the tactical level makes decisions on the use and application of resources, senior leadership on the strategic level is able to ensure that resources are used in ways that benefit the entire organization. The use of performance measurement metrics allows leaders on all levels to evaluate effectiveness and make decisions regarding future performance.

Excerpt: Maximizing Financial Performance: Pinpoint Leadership Skill Development Training Series (Majorium Business Press, Stevens Point, WI 2011) $ 16.95 USD

Related:

Performance Management Must Begin With the Manage

Attaining Organizational Results Requires Visionary Thinking and Planning on Multiple Levels

Performance Plans Create Results and Maximizes Performance

Measure What Needs to Be Measured

For Additional Information the Author Recommends the Following Books:

Performance Management: The Pinpoint Management Skill Development Training Series

Planning to Maximize Performance: Pinpoint Leadership Skill Development Training Series

Strengthening Leadership Performance: Pinpoint Leadership Skill Development Training Series

Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D. | Author | Publisher | Majorium Business Press
Author of Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Finalist – 2011 Foreword Reviews‘ Book of the Year)
Linkedin | Facebook | Twitter | Web| Blog | Catalog |800.654.4935 | 715.342.1018

Copyright © 2013 Timothy F. Bednarz, All Rights Reserved

Empowered Organizations Develop Employee Commitment

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smallgroup2

The purpose of empowerment in an organization is to decentralize management and control throughout the organization. The overall effect is to build customer loyalty by creating internal employee ownership of productivity, quality, and the principles for which an organization stands.

The sole purpose of creating an empowered organization is to develop employee commitment. The role of the leader in this capacity is to ensure that the same common mission and set of values is communicated throughout their organization and are consistent with those of other individual leaders in the organization. This means that leaders must match words with actions to instill the right character and culture within their organization.

As control is decentralized within their organization, both leaders and employees assume a greater role of responsibility in decisions affecting effectiveness, productivity and profitability.

Leaders must make sure that decisions impacting efficiency, cost-cutting, and overall value are made with as much participation of the frontline employees they impact as possible.

The key to organizational empowerment is to make employees part of management rather than individual cogs in a wheel, holding them accountable for their individual actions. This creates positive organizational change with distinct advantages:

  • Employees become more cost conscious.
  • Employees become involved in the cost-value trade-off decisions that must be made if an organization is to remain competitive.
  • Employees work toward continuous improvement in value efficiency as well as quality effectiveness.
  • Employees experience an overall reduction in frustrations as well as an elimination of continued inefficiencies within the organization.

Empowered employees who are included and involved in the management of an organization respond by acting like owners themselves. This is something that managers and leaders cannot achieve with slogans or manipulative methods to force employee compliance and conformance. These faulty methods run counter to motivational principles.

As employees become empowered and assume personal ownership, attitudes and behaviors begin to shift in accordance with their personal beliefs. They become more conscious of workplace factors impacting the effectiveness, productivity and profitability of their organizational unit.

This is the desired objective of the organization: frontline employees focused on making essential decisions that improve the quality of the product or service and the value it provides the customer.

Organizations must become increasingly cost-conscious in an increasingly global and competitive environment. Empowered organizations flatten decision making and bring it directly to the “trenches” of the organization. Employees in the front lines are able to make more effective decisions because they are properly focused.

This insures that cost cuts and efficiency improvements are made in the right places without injuring the quality and value of their product or service. To make this truly effective, leaders must ensure a system is in place that makes cost consciousness every employee’s concern.

The less involvement of employees at the front lines of an organization, the more unseen and hidden costs are overlooked. The farther away these decisions are made from their point of impact, the harder it is to arrive at the right decisions without harming both the quality and value of a product or service.

Within an empowered organization, the more frontline people—who most directly benefit from a reduction of costs and enhanced value—actively involved in decisions, the more effective decisions will be. This is important to note since too many organizations place an emphasis on cost controls rather than on the production of value. While this may look good on paper, these decisions undermine the overall quality of products/services and diminish customer satisfaction levels.

Within the empowered organization, employees will often extend their job descriptions on their own and work diligently to eliminate the inefficiencies that create cost-value problems in their workplace. This is often the more widespread kind of commitment organizations will experience when they empower their employees and give them the authority to manage their work and make decisions on their own.

This only occurs because employees are empowered to question existing methods and concepts and are encouraged to experiment with new ideas and concepts for the sole purpose of increasing efficiency. This is highly effective in reducing frustrations and cutting costs where they really matter, rather than in random and often painful ways that compromise the quality of the product or service being produced.

Related:

Power Must Be Shared for Organizations to Grow

Empowerment is a Structured Discipline

Seven Key Benefits of an Empowered Workplace

Four Major Hindrances to Empowerment

Excerpt: Organizational Empowerment (Majorium Business Press, Stevens Point, WI 2011) $ 19.95 USD

Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D. | Author | Publisher | Majorium Business Press
Author of Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Finalist – 2011 Foreword Reviews‘ Book of the Year)
Linkedin | Facebook | Twitter | Web| Blog | Catalog |800.654.4935 | 715.342.1018

Copyright © 2013 Timothy F. Bednarz, All Rights Reserved

Leaders Possess an Absolute Love for What They Do

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos Photo by David McNew/Getty Images

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos
Photo by David McNew/Getty Images

Great leaders are passionate. They possess an absolute love for what they do. Steve Jobs (Apple Computer) observed, “I don’t think of my life as a career… I do stuff. I respond to stuff. That’s not a career — it’s a life!” [1]

Howard Schultz (Starbucks) concurred when he said: When you love something, when you care so much, when you feel the responsibility… you find another gear.”

James Duke (American Tobacco Company) enthusiastically expressed his passion, when he noted, “I hated to close my desk at night and was eager to get back to it early next morning. I needed no vacation or time off. No fellow does who is really interested in his work.” [2]

Ray Kroc (McDonald’s) couldn’t say enough about his fifteen-cent hamburgers, and Sam Walton (Wal-Mart) was equally passionate about the value that Wal-Mart offered to the average person. Both were evangelists for their companies.

Another passionate evangelist was James Casey (United Parcel Service), as anyone who knew him understood that “it just took the right topic to get him excited. And that topic was packages. He loved everything about them–the care that went into their wrapping, the sense of mystery about their contents, the delight in opening them.

A 1947 New Yorker profile found him observing a department store’s package-wrapping station and waxing enthusiastic–and then some–on the proceedings: ‘Deft fingers! Deft fingers wrapping thousands of bundles. Neatly tied! Neatly addressed! Stuffed with soft tissue paper! What a treat! Ah, packages!’ ” [3]

Why is passion so important and why does it contribute so much to one’s success? “Passion is about our emotional energy and a love for what we do. Without passion it becomes difficult to fight back in the face of obstacles and difficulties.

People with passion find a way to get things done and to make things happen, in spite of the obstacles and challenges that get in the way.” [4]

Herb Kelleher (Southwest Airlines) stressed the importance of passion when he stated, “When we talk to other people about Southwest Airlines, I always tell them that it’s got to come from the heart not from the head. It has to be spontaneous, it has to be sincere, it has to be emotional. I said, ‘Nobody will believe it if they think it’s just another program that was conjured up for six months time and then you’re going to drop it.

The power of it in creating trust is that people have to see that you really radiate, that it’s a passion with you, and you’re not saying these things because you think they are clever or a way to produce more productivity or produce greater profits, but because you really want things to go well for them, individually.” [5]

Jeff Bezos (Amazon) made the following observation about how passion works, and why it motivates so well. “You don’t choose your passions, your passions choose you… One of the huge mistakes people make is that they try to force an interest on themselves.

If you’re really interested in software and computer science, you should focus on that. But if you’re really interested in medicine, and you decide you’re going to become an Internet entrepreneur because it looks like everybody else is doing well, then that’s probably not going to work.

You don’t choose your passions, your passions choose you. One of the reasons you saw so many companies that were formed in 1998 or 1999 fail is that they were chasing the wave. And that usually doesn’t work. Find that area that you are interested in and passionate about—and wait for the wave to find you.” [6]

Related:

  1. How Well Do You Set the Tone?
  2. Leaders Possess a Deeply Embedded Sense of Purpose
  3. Your Personal Attitudes Shape Your Environment

References:

  1. Fry Stephen, The iPad Launch: Can Steve Jobs Do It Again? (Time Magazine, April 1, 2010)
  2. Klein Maury, The Change Makers (Henry Holt and Company, LLC, New York, NY 2003) p. 99-100
  3. Lukas Paul, Overfelt Maggie, UPS United Parcel Service James Casey Transformed a Tiny Messenger Service into the World’s Largest Shipper By Getting All Wrapped Up in the Details of Package Delivery (Fortune Small Business, April 1, 2003)
  4. Ambler George, Steve Jobs and His Leadership (The Practice of Leadership, March 30, 2008)
  5. Yeh Raymond T. with Yeh Stephanie H., The Art of Business: In the Footsteps of Giants (published October 1, 2004)
  6. Walker Rob, Jeff Bezos Amazon.com – America’s 25 Most Fascinating Entrepreneurs (Inc. Magazine, April 1, 2004)

Excerpt: Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Majorium Business Press, Stevens Point, WI 2011) Read a Free Chapter

Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D. | Author | Publisher | Majorium Business Press
Author of Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Finalist – 2011 Foreword Reviews‘ Book of the Year)
Linkedin | Facebook | Twitter | Web| Blog | Catalog |800.654.4935 | 715.342.1018

Copyright © 2012 Timothy F. Bednarz, All Rights Reserved

Written by Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D.

December 4, 2012 at 9:31 am

Eight Leadership Principles You Can’t Ignore

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Effective leadership is the result of acting according to reliable practices as well as intuition. Managers as leaders use sound management and leadership principles to guide and direct their actions and activities. They know where they want to go and what specifically needs to be done in order to get there, and that each particular step needs to be carefully considered as to the consequences associated with specific actions and decisions.

There is a difference between managers who lead and those who supervise. Leaders use sound management and leadership principles as tools to help them achieve their goals and objectives. More traditional managers often attempt to use their authority to protect their “turfs” with little or no regard for the people they are responsible for.

Managers as leaders are driven by a vision of what they want to accomplish. They always have their “eye on the prize” and know just where they want to go and why. They work through their employees using their own passion as a strong motivational tool, demonstrating the possibilities of what all can achieve together.

Managers as successful leaders must be enthusiastic and positive in all of their actions and interactions. This is demonstrated by the use of the following key leadership principles:

Related: Plans Must Be Rooted in Past Performance

Planning

Planning has suffered with the inception of many 90s management fads. Many in the now defunct dot-com companies proclaimed that planning was an obsolete management function. The accepted view was that circumstances change too quickly to be effectively planned for. They fully believed that it was better to be reactive rather than proactive. The failure of this theory was evident in the bursting of the dot-com bubble.

Good leaders know their success is founded on solid management principles—including planning. They also understand that things are always in flux and changing, and they plan accordingly to anticipate what must be done to accommodate particular changes. They take the necessary time to frequently modify their plans to bring them into line with actual conditions.

Organization

Managers as leaders must understand how to apply and use organizational matrixes to gauge and measure their personal time, efforts and resources as well as those of their employees. Matrixes allow for simultaneous monitoring of various organizational activities across multiple levels.

Effective organizational management provides leaders strategic control over their areas of workplace responsibility. One of their major roles is to manage employees and make certain they are producing ongoing results. Managers are also responsible for the various behaviors and outcomes of the people they manage. This can only be accomplished through effective organizational practices and methods.

Related: Linking Structure to Action

Stimulation

Managers who lead must be exceptional motivators. They must learn how to effectively use their passions and visions to attract and motivate others. But as motivation is not enough, they must also use ideas, conceptions and actions to stimulate their employees’ thinking and stretch their capabilities. They must make it a point to understand the individuality of everyone they manage and apply different techniques to stimulate and motivate each in the most effective manner.

Related: Ten Steps You Need to Take to Effectively Sell Your Ideas

Information

Leaders are always mindful of the power that information has on their personal ability to perform effectively. Today, too many managers are awash in information, while starving for expertise.

Leaders must be able to distill the vast flow of information into usable metrics and data, which makes it easier to understand what is happening within their organizations. Detailed informational input should actively support all key management metrics and help keep ongoing tabs on every aspect of employees’ important activities. Accessing particular information only when it is required without excessive daily review allows them the freedom to manage effectively without being bogged down by information overload.

Leaders must also understand the need for the free-flow of information between superiors, associates and employees. This allows for effective management and communication on all levels.

Time Management

Time is a limited resource, and managers must be able to use it wisely. They need to employ time-saving techniques such as delegation and empowerment to free themselves from tasks and assignments others can just as easily see to. They should look at every activity to determine whether or not it moves them closer to their goals and vision. Activities that do not fit this criterion should either be delegated or dispensed with.

Related: You Keep Innovating if You Want to Keep Leading

Idea Development

To be competitive and gain an organizational advantage, managers as leaders must create and develop new ideas and concepts. They should always be looking for new and better approaches and for ways to accomplish more with less. A good way to identify and implement ideas, methods or concepts is to brainstorm with associates or employees to determine ways to gain even the smallest marketplace advantage.

Value

Managers as leaders must understand that maintaining and nurturing customer relationships has considerable organizational value. As nothing can be taken for granted, repeatedly meeting and exceeding customers’ expectations becomes a top priority. When customer satisfaction is achieved, value is delivered. Managers must incorporate the fact that there will be no compromise on value into their vision statement. Satisfied customers make their professional existence possible.

Related: Do You Have the Talent to Execute Get Things Done?

Efficiency

Effective managers know it takes little extra time and effort to do things right the first time, while carelessness wastes a great deal of time and valuable resources. All organizations have limited resources and managers must work hard to maximize return on investments with those assigned to them. They must make it a point to always look for ways to increase their organizational efficiency, productivity and profitability.

Excerpt: Leadership: Pinpoint Management Skill Development Training Series (Majorium Business Press, Stevens Point, WI 2011) $ 16.95 USD

 

Timothy F. Bednarz, Ph.D. | Author | Publisher | Majorium Business Press
Author of Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Finalist – 2011 Foreward Reviews‘ Book of the Year)
Linkedin | Facebook | Twitter | Web| Blog | Catalog |800.654.4935 | 715.342.1018

Copyright © 2012 Timothy F. Bednarz, All Rights Reserved

You Don’t Choose Your Passions, Your Passions Choose You

with 8 comments

Howard-Schultz-Starbucks

Great leaders are passionate. They possess an absolute love for what they do. Steve Jobs (Apple Computer) observed, “I don’t think of my life as a career… I do stuff. I respond to stuff. That’s not a career — it’s a life!” [1] Howard Schultz (Starbucks) concurred when he said: When you love something, when you care so much, when you feel the responsibility… you find another gear.”

James Duke (American Tobacco Company) enthusiastically expressed his passion, when he noted, “I hated to close my desk at night and was eager to get back to it early next morning. I needed no vacation or time off. No fellow does who is really interested in his work.” [2]

Ray Kroc (McDonald’s) couldn’t say enough about his fifteen-cent hamburgers, and Sam Walton (Wal-Mart) was equally passionate about the value that Wal-Mart offered to the average person. Both were evangelists for their companies.

Another passionate evangelist was James Casey (United Parcel Service), as anyone who knew him understood that “it just took the right topic to get him excited. And that topic was packages. He loved everything about them–the care that went into their wrapping, the sense of mystery about their contents, the delight in opening them. A 1947 New Yorker profile found him observing a department store’s package-wrapping station and waxing enthusiastic–and then some–on the proceedings: ‘Deft fingers! Deft fingers wrapping thousands of bundles. Neatly tied! Neatly addressed! Stuffed with soft tissue paper! What a treat! Ah, packages!’[3]

Why is passion so important and why does it contribute so much to one’s success? Passion is about our emotional energy and a love for what we do. Without passion it becomes difficult to fight back in the face of obstacles and difficulties. People with passion find a way to get things done and to make things happen, in spite of the obstacles and challenges that get in the way.” [4]

Herb Kelleher (Southwest Airlines) stressed the importance of passion when he stated, “When we talk to other people about Southwest Airlines, I always tell them that it’s got to come from the heart not from the head. It has to be spontaneous, it has to be sincere, it has to be emotional. I said, ‘Nobody will believe it if they think it’s just another program that was conjured up for six months time and then you’re going to drop it. The power of it in creating trust is that people have to see that you really radiate, that it’s a passion with you, and you’re not saying these things because you think they are clever or a way to produce more productivity or produce greater profits, but because you really want things to go well for them, individually.” [5]

Jeff Bezos (Amazon) made the following observation about how passion works, and why it motivates so well. “You don’t choose your passions, your passions choose you… One of the huge mistakes people make is that they try to force an interest on themselves. If you’re really interested in software and computer science, you should focus on that. But if you’re really interested in medicine, and you decide you’re going to become an Internet entrepreneur because it looks like everybody else is doing well, then that’s probably not going to work. You don’t choose your passions, your passions choose you. One of the reasons you saw so many companies that were formed in 1998 or 1999 fail is that they were chasing the wave. And that usually doesn’t work. Find that area that you are interested in and passionate about—and wait for the wave to find you.” [6]


[1]  Fry Stephen, The iPad Launch: Can Steve Jobs Do It Again? (Time Magazine, April 1, 2010)

[2]  Klein Maury, The Change Makers (Henry Holt and Company, LLC, New York, NY 2003) p. 99-100

[3]  Lukas Paul, Overfelt Maggie, UPS United Parcel Service James Casey Transformed a Tiny Messenger Service into the World’s Largest Shipper By Getting All Wrapped Up in the Details of Package Delivery (Fortune Small Business, April 1, 2003)

[4]  Ambler George, Steve Jobs and His Leadership (The Practice of Leadership, March 30, 2008)

[5]  Yeh Raymond T. with Yeh Stephanie H., The Art of Business: In the Footsteps of Giants (published October 1, 2004)

[6]  Walker Rob, Jeff Bezos Amazon.com – America’s 25 Most Fascinating Entrepreneurs (Inc. Magazine, April 1, 2004)

Excerpt: Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It (Majorium Business Press, 2011)

If you would like to learn more about the passions of the great American leaders through their own inspiring words and stories, refer to Great! What Makes Leaders Great: What They Did, How They Did It and What You Can Learn From It. It illustrates how great leaders built great companies, and how you can apply the strategies, concepts and techniques that they pioneered to improve your own leadership skills.Click here to learn more.

Copyright © 2011 Timothy F. Bednarz, All Rights Reserved

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